Archive for January, 2011

What the heck is a pomelo?

This week we’re offering a favorite of Southeast Asia, the pomelo. This super-thick rind citrus is like a big sweet grapefruit, without the sour, lip puckering bitterness. These guys are big; they’re bigger than a softball, but smaller than a basketball. The pale green peel can be used to make marmalade, or is candied and sometimes dipped in chocolate. The peel of the pomelo is also used in Chinese cooking, specifically in sweet soup desserts. Our pomelos are coming in to us from H&R Citrus farms in Orange Cove, California. And, those guys know their citrus; they grow oranges, tangelos and, of course, pomelos. Most us have never heard of a pomelo before, but it turns out we all owe a debt […]

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When I find myself with a fridge overflowing with fresh produce, I usually pick up the phone, call a friend, and invite them over for an evening of cooking adventures.   This weekend, my good friend Amber joined me for a night of slow cooker experimenting and soup creating.  We may have made a mess in the kitchen, but in the end, we reached culinary success. The slow cooker is a great tool for using up extra produce.    What happens with you combine lots of organic veggies with a craving for ginger and coconut? Enter Dish #1: Slow Cooker Green Curry. Even after filling up an entire slow cooker with veggies, we still had extra produce to put to use.  Enter […]

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quinoa, black bean and corn salad

Back in the days where I lived in Crestone in an un-heated adobe hut without electricity or running water, I ate a lot of quinoa prepared on a camp stove.  At the time we ate quinoa because it was a cheap and healthy protein, and I wasn’t so concerned over the taste. We’d order it in 15 lb bags, and it’d come all the way from Bolivia even though there was a farm that produced beautiful organic quinoa 25 miles down the road. Go figure. These days, I am lucky to have the time, energy and proper kitchen to create good food. I still want it to be healthy, but I’d like it to taste good. I found a recipe […]

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leeks_250

Leeks, which are thought to be native to Central Asia, are in the same family as onions and garlic. We think they kinda look like gigantic green onions. Many people who don’t like onions actually prefer leeks for their milder and sweeter flavor. If you haven’t tried them yet, now is your chance. Place fresh leeks that are unwashed and untrimmed in a plastic bag. They can be stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. The bag will help your leeks retain their moisture. The edible part of the leek is the tender white part that remains underground. To maximize the edible part, farmers pile up the soil around the stalks to promote a long thin white base. […]

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Creamy Mushroom Soup

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What do Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, kale and broccoli have in common? They’re all related to cauliflower, though broccoli is its closest relative. Cauliflower contains sulforaphane – an anti-cancer compound, is high in fiber and full of vitamin C. British scientists have shown that cauliflower will retain more of its anti-cancer properties when microwaved as compared to boiling. Even without cooking, cauliflower is delicious raw with a little ranch or blue cheese dressing. Cauliflower can be prepared in many different ways; it can be boiled, steamed, roasted or fried.  It is also a great substitute for potatoes. Boiled and mashed they have the same texture as mashed potatoes, but without all the carbs, as they lack the starch of potatoes. […]

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